First Sculpture Up In Poetry Yard

Desiccation: Dormancy: Deluge, a sculpture by Isabel Winson-Sagan, is the first piece to go up in the Yard. It is made of wood and the plastic caps off of baby formula. It references forest fire, and the flooding caused by ecological destruction.

The photographs are by Matthew Morrow.

Miriam and Isabel are a mother/daughter creative dup working under the name Maternal Mitochondria.

If you are interested in visiting the Yard or proposing a project, contact us at msagan1035@aol.com


Artist’s Statement from Isabel Winson-Sagan
Miriam Sagan will be opening The Poetry Yard this year, an outside space where sculpture and poetry can be fully experienced. Here is a sneak peak at the first sculpture to go up- a permanent feature of the yard. Made entirely of recycled materials, this land art project helps direct rainfall by incorporating a dry pond. The sculpture’s relationship with the land may change over time- will the wood rot when exposed to water? Or will it remain an ever present reminder of fire and drought? As our climate changes, the sculpture may reflect that change on a local level. Along with the ambiguity and anxiety of climate change, “Desiccation: Dormancy: Deluge” brings up issues of human consumption and how different organisms feed. The sculpture takes inspiration from saprophytic fungi (mushrooms that consume dead wood) and the twin processes of parasitic and symbiotic growth. The plastic and dairy industries are an ambiguous two-edged sword- using unsustainable environmental practices while at the same time greatly expanding human access to food and vital resources. So the question is: how do we achieve a balance between human needs and biological destruction?
The text on the piece reads:
(A triangle) Between me / G-d / and the water

Free Haibun Workshop on Zoom

Santa Fe Community College Library Presents

Haibun Workshop with Miriam Sagan

Haibun is the prose and haiku combination first developed in Japan. It can be considered the original hybrid form! We’ll learn about haibun and write pieces that include timed writing, diary entries, and flash memoir. We’ll practice with placement of haiku, contrast, and metaphorical thinking. For writers at all levels. Background material and resources will be sent to each participant before the workshop

Tuesday, October 5th from 6-8pm (Mountain Time)
Haibun (haiku & prose) Workshop via Zoom
Free and open to the public but space is limited, and participants must register.
To register: write msagan1035@aol.com

Stone Quarry Hill Art Park

About a dozen years ago, I had the opportunity to be a writer in residence in this outdoor sculpture park in upstate New York. It looks like things are taking off there these days!

Clavaria: A Light Installation by Annie Mitchell
Join us at the Art Park in the dark on August 20 and August 27 to experience light and sound artist Annie Mitchell’s Clavaria, a fiber optic sculptural installation. This happening is free and offers a very special opportunity to experience Mitchell’s captivating work that transforms our experience of the Art Park’s grounds.
Happening dates & times:
Friday, August 20: 9pm & 10pm
Friday, August 27: 9pm & 10pm
Register for this special free happening! https://www.eventbrite.com/…/clavaria-a-light…
Photo description: A small figure kneeling amidst glowing blue fiber optics emerging from a large tree. Photo courtesy of the artist.

New from Dale Harris

Albuquerque writer and book artist Dale Harris says:

Had a wonderful time making my version of a Kamishibai storytelling box for our Paper Dolls exhibit. I plan to use it for my 2 fairy tales at the Oct. 1st Artist Reception Story Hour.


Kamishibai is a portable theatre invented and used in Japan about 200 years ago. The word Kamishibai means to provide drama with paper. It is a simple way of telling stories using pictures drawn on cards or sheets of paper, to small groups of people. The theatre is made from a flat wooden or cardboard box. The front opens out to form a small theatre, with a side opening for putting the pictures in and out. In Japan Kamishibai was traditionally used by storytellers who would travel from village to village on their bicycles, entertaining people with stories in return for payment. Performances were announced by vigorously clapping wooden sticks called hyoshigi together.

“Paper Dolls: Evolution & Articulation” group exhibit September 3 – October 29, 2021 featuring Louisa Barkalow, Vicki Bolen, Terry Garrett, Dale Harris, Esther Feske, Margy O’Brien and Ginger RiceRemarque/New Grounds Print Workshop & Gallery3281 Central Ave Se, Albuquerque, NM 87108(505) 268-8952www.remarqueprintshop.com Please join us for the exciting opening of “Paper Dolls”- a collective show featuring the work of local Albuquerque artists who explore the boundaries of work in and on paper. Get ready to meet the “sheeple” dolls, fairy tales revisited, handmade books, surprising shadow boxes, unexpected collaborations and more. 
Virtual Reception & Artist Talk September 1, 5 pmregister via Face Book https://fb.me/e/1EadKIYpTFirst Friday IN PERSON Opening Reception September 3, 5 pm                                      Harp music Michele Buchanan                                                                Opening Reception: PAPER DOLLS-Evolution and Articulation
First Friday IN PERSON Artist Reception & Story HourOctober 1, 5 pm

Start Again by Miriam Sagan

Hard at work at putting finishing touches on this poetry book. It will be out early in 2022! I love the cover photograph and design by Susan Gardner at Red Mountain. I’m finding the whole concept more…optimistic…than I was feeling during the pandemic lockdown when I wrote much of this. In retrospect, I’m seeing more hope in the poems than I realized at the time.

Just A Reminder–end of month writing Jumpstart!

REGISTRATION OPEN!
Miriam Sagan Weekend Retreat
Friday Evening – Saturday January 24-25, 2020.
At Jules’ Poetry Playhouse, Placitas, NM
REGISTER HERE: https://www.julesnyquist.com/catalog/item/1420675/10415453.htm
Keeping A Poetic Diary will emphasize techniques that can bring journal keeping alive and create finished pieces. We’ll work with lists, letters, flash memoir, and more—as well as traditional Japanese approaches of haiku and prose (haibun) and poetry with visuals (haibun). Expect timed writing, reading aloud, doodling, a look at blogging, and inspiration. Models range from Joanne Kyger’s twentieth century “Strange Big Moon” to tenth century “Pillow Book.”

 Miriam Sagan is the author of DIRTY LAUNDRY (100 Days in A Zen Monastery, New World Library) with Robert Winson and A HUNDRED CUPS OF COFFEE (2019, Tres Chicas Press). Miriam lives in Santa Fe, NM.

Save The Dates!

Sat Sept 28 1-3pm
100 Thousand Poets for Change
Great line-up of about 20 readers, nice shade, come for some or all…at Ethyl the Whale on SFCC Campus (right across from La Familia clinic at SFCC)

Sun Oct 6
2 pm
Op Cit in the De Vargas mall
Miriam Sagan reading from new book of a two year diary, A Hundred Cups of Coffee, and Melissa White reading about Japan in her memoir Dizzy Sushi.

100 Thousand Poets for Change–Santa Fe–September 28. Please Join Us!

SFCC will host local 100 Thousand Poets for Change event from 1 to 3 p.m. September 28
Poets will read by Ethyl the Whale sculpture, public invited to free event on campus

SANTA FE, NM – Santa Fe Community College will host a Santa Fe 100 Thousand Poets for Change event from 1 to 3 p.m. Sept. 28 outdoors by the Ethyl the Whale sculpture on the college campus, 6401 Richards Ave.(Just across from La Familia clinic on campus) Michael Rothenberg organizes the international event. In Santa Fe, poet Miriam Sagan (former director of the creative writing program at SFCC) and Santa Fe Poet Laureate Elizabeth Jacobsen are organizing the Santa Fe event.

More than 25 poets will participate. Each poet will read one poem that speaks to peace, justice, sustainability – social, environmental and political change. Readers include Jacobson, Joan Logghe, Tom Ireland, Beyzad Dayeny, Jamie Figueroa, John Macker, Barbara Rockman, Serena Rodriguez, Barbara Robidoux, Mary McGinnis, Shuli Lamden and many others. The readers include community poets, as well as staff, faculty, students, alumni and friends of SFCC.