Haiku Pathway

Launched last week! Come see it in central courtyard of Santa Fe Community College. A few additions and corrections coming soon, but it’s basically done!

Stoneware haiku created and installed by Christy Hengst. Haiku curated by Miriam Sagan. Funding from the Witter-Bynner Foundation, Santa Fe’s own extraordinary poetry foundation that enhances our lives in many venues. Support from SFCC Foundation, New Mexico Literary Arts, the ever lively Art on Campus, and my old home base–The English Department.

Photographs by Matt Marrow.

International Haiku Contest

GENJUAN International Haibun Contest 2018 GUIDELINES – NEW!
Genjuan 幻住庵 is the name of the cottage near Lake Biwa where, in 1690, Basho lived for a time. His residence in this ‘Vision-Inhabited Cottage’ was probably the happiest period of his life, and it was there that he wrote his most famous short haibun. The purpose of the Contest is to encourage the writing of fine haibun in English and maintain the connection between the traditional Japanese perception of haibun and what is evolving around the world. The judges are hoping that the Contest will continue to receive a warm response from all haibun writers. The award for the Grand Prix remains the same – a fine, full-size replica of a Hokusai or Hiroshige ukiyo-e print – and smaller gifts will be sent to the An (Cottage) Prize-winners. The writers of all the decorated works will receive a certificate of merit. We sincerely look forward to your participation.

Guidelines for 2018

1 Subject: Free.

2 Style: No restrictions, but special attention must be paid to honour the spirit of haikai. This includes such features as the subtle linking of haiku with prose, omission prompting the reader’s imagination, humour and self-depracation.

3 Length: In total, between 7 and 35 lines (at 1 line = 80 spaces; a 3-line haiku counts as 3 lines; the title, as 1 line).

4 Haiku/Title: At least one haiku (no formal restrictions) should be included and each piece should be given a title, however short.

5 Format: Print each piece separately on one sheet of A4-size paper (and use the reverse if long) and write at the bottom your name (and your pen name, if you have one) together with your address, telephone number, and email address. Your privacy will be strictly protected, and the judges will not see your names until the result has been decided.

6 Deadline: All entries should reach the following address between 1 October 2017 and 31 January 2018. Please send your entries to: Ms. Eiko Mori, 2-11-23-206 Jokoji, Amagasaki-shi, Hyogo-ken 660-0811, Japan. Entries received after this date might not be accepted. Kindly avoid sending by express and using extra-large envelopes. Best write your home address on your envelope, too. We apologize for not being able to accept emailed entries.

7 Entry Fee: None.

8 Restrictions: Entrants can send up to three entries, but two is what we normally expect. They should be unpublished and not under consideration elsewhere. As we cannot return your entries after screening, please retain your own copies.

9 Questions: All queries should be sent to the address above or by email to moriemori55@yahoo.co.jp Email Ms. Mori 2 weeks after sending your entries if you wish to have an acknowledgement of receipt.

10 Judges: Nenten Tsubouchi (emeritus), Stephen Henry Gill (Tito), Hisashi Miyazaki, Angelee Deodhar (newly appointed)

11 Special Request: The authors of the decorated works will later be requested to send us their pieces as Word-files by email. In this, we expect your cooperation.
12 Results: The results will be posted on the Hailstone Icebox by May after awardees have first been notified by email. Later, the prize-winning pieces will be posted there on a dedicated page. Judges’ comments will, in due course, be sent to awardees, together with prizes and/or certificates of merit.

Mexican Haiku

Christina Rascon Castro gave a wonderful presentation on this at Haiku North America. The translated haiku were a highlight.
These are from her selection of early Mexican haiku, which may present as much as very short Modernist Spanish poems as they do as haiku. Yet I get the haiku flavor as well.
I hope to post more of her presentation later.

Arturo González Cosío (Mexico City, 1930-2016)

Oculta el bosque
entre ramas y hojas
murmullos de agua.

The forest hides
among branches and leaves
murmurs of water

De Otras mutaciones del I Ching

59. Huan / La disolución

Viento sobre las aguas
boga el barquero
con la nostalgia.

Wind over the waters
searches the boat man
with nostalgia.

Enrique González Rojo (Mexico city, 1928)

Luna en el agua
Se empalaga la espuma
de albura tanta

Moon on the water
the foam gets sick
of so much whiteness

EDUARDO LIZALDE (Mexico City, 1929)
De Otros tigres

ALGUNOS HAIKAIS TIGRESCOS
(de métrica ortodoxa y no)

VI

Puede en su furia
pantera acorralada
rasgar su sombra.

In its anger can
a cornered panther
rip its shadow.

VII

Una pantera acorralada
puede en su furia
desgarrar su sombra.

A cornered panther
can in its anger
rip its shadow.

Kigo–Season Word

At a haiku conference for five days, and then slept upwards of twelve hours. This morning, it seems the season has changed without my noticing it. Our easy going house guest has gone, and instead numerous daddy long legs fill the corners of the room. All of the pots of mums have suddenly dried and died–I bought them past their peak to impress visitors that the garden was still blooming when it really wasn’t. Other spiders cluster, and something–predator or prey–leaves a tiny red smear on the wall.

I don’t think
just one word
can describe this

Brass Bell

This is an invitation to submit haiku for the October 2017 issue of brass bell: an online haiku journal.

Theme: body haiku
(haiku about parts of the body)

Include reference to some body part (or the whole body) in your poem(s). Could be related to your body, or to someone else’s.

I will consider one-line and 3-line haiku.

I STRONGLY PREFER new work but previously published poems are okay as long as they do NOT require a credit line (attribution).

PLEASE send more than one poem! I will be looking for variety and the more choices I have, the better. Send up to 10 haiku for consideration.

Deadline:
Wednesday, September 20, 5 p.m. U.S. Eastern Time.
HINT: it is better to send sooner rather than later!

Expected publication date: Sunday October 1, 2017

GUIDELINES:

Paste your haiku in the body of an email — no attachments — and send to:

zee@twcny.rr.com

Be sure to include your name exactly as you wish it to appear, as well as your country. The list of countries will be noted at the top, not with each poem. PLEASE don’t forget to include your country, especially if you do not live in the U.S.A.

If you haven’t been to the brass bell site before then I urge you to visit; read the current issue and browse through the archives. This will also give you a good idea of what I am most drawn to.
http://brassbellhaiku.blogspot.com/

Please do not post this invitation to groups, I don’t want to be overwhelmed! THANK YOU.

NOTE: I’ll acknowledge receipt of your submission. If I have questions or suggestions, or if I don’t feel I can use the haiku you sent, I will let you know. Otherwise, I hope you will be pleasantly surprised when you see what I have chosen, when the issue goes online. I’ll send you the link as soon as I publish the October issue.

I look forward to reading your Body Haiku!
Fondly,
Zee

http://www.zeezahava.blogspot.com/
http://lostpaper.blogspot.com/
http://paintedparrot.blogspot.com/