In The Mimbres Valley: Haibun by Miriam Sagan

Tired of walking in the snowy arroyo, following footprints left by God knows who, my mood deteriorates. Leaning on my cane I follow you, not wanting to disappoint your faith in my enthusiasm. Suddenly I come upon a huge boulder completely covered in swirling marine fossils—the “jellyfish” and “sea cucumbers” of the pre-Cambrian seas, invertebrate swirls like stone whirlpools. And someone, greedy and eager, has chiseled off a substantial chunk. I judge them, these unseen thieves, but can’t blame them completely.

in my change purse
tiny red chip of
an ancient pot

“Just five more minutes,” you say. But I’ve given up and am sitting on a rock, sobbing with pain and effort. I’ve cursed you, the snow, my feet inappropriately in sneakers, my lame right leg, my stubborn pride. And you have a cellphone snap to show me—the unexciting sketchy pictograph you were in search of. It isn’t dramatic, but you have the satisfaction of a quest fulfilled.

Walking back, I’m glad I gave up when I did. My eyes on the ground, I see more fossils.

black volcanic rock
shining, chock full of tiny
shimmering crystals

It’s Very Strange To Stop In Chama, New Mexico

And not drive into Colorado–but we are being law abiding!

Luckily haiku doesn’t care about borders.

large guy swatting
flies—I’ll avoid
this cafe table

a small rainbow—
check tire pressure
light stays on

curled dead mouse—
quiet conversation
crossing high grasslands

I can’t stop laughing
for no reason—we’ve been
married a long time

Richard Wright Haiku

Richard Wright, of course, is best known for his books about race in the U.S.A–“Black Boy” and “Native Son.” In the last few years of his life he was an expatriate in France, and started writing haiku. It’s always fascinating when a writer skilled in one genre crosses over to another. And the transition from realistic novelist to haiku poet is an unusual trajectory.

His haiku is much loved and admired by those who know it. He, like Kerouac, was not part of any English language haiku society or scene. I find him one of the strongest voices in 20th century American haiku poetry.

I am nobody:
A red sinking autumn sun
Took my name away.

A sleepless spring night:
Yearning for what I never had
And for what never was.

Keep straight down this block,
then turn right where you will find
a peach tree blooming

A freezing morning:
I left a bit of my skin
on the broomstick

The Christmas season:
a whore is painting her lips
larger than they are

Bird Haiku by Michael G. Smith

still raven
on the bike trail
wild roses blooming

starling versus bluebird bird house

raccoon leg hanging out of the hole mated flickers wait

cat’s back turned
one-legged magpie
eats from the bowl

a killdeer
in the vacant lot
her song lingers

curious towhee
looks down at me
changing the oil

garage clear
two sparrows
steal string

woodpecker snags
a grasshopper
out of the air

Old Lady Haiku by Miriam Sagan

Title IX’s fourth title, Old Lady Haiku by Miriam Sagan, is a MUST READ! This little collection is stunning. Scott Wiggerman says “Sagan’s haiku, witty and astute, are a constant reminder that age is as much of the body as of the mind.”

Click here to read and download your copy: https://e7b207b8-f70d-4a2b-9a92-95e280e7fb92.filesusr.com/…

Or, you can head over to the library to browse all the e-chaps Title IX has to offer: https://titleixpress.wixsite.com/home/library